Topic 3: Why we need females for sustainability

Source: Aid to gender equality and women’s empowerment (oecd.org)

In developed economies women tend to be overrepresented in low-income groups and these are unfortunately the groups more frequently affected by pollution in cities as well as other environmental crises. How can it still hold?  How can this still be the case when we know that both gender and the environment issues are top priorities on the international agenda. More importantly what are we missing? Although the number of women climate negotiators was respectably high, in the senior official level the more the gender equation started to shift. This has an impact on the negotiating process. A better recognition of the gender environment Nexus would be a key first step. A recent OECD survey showed that 21 out of the 38 member countries of the OECD report that gender aspects are considered at least some of the time in their environmental policy making. However only 11 do so systematically. Countries need to do better in mainstreaming gender in their environmental policies that means making sure all indicators and data can be disaggregated to get that gender perspective. It is the only way policy makers can effectively address the disproportionate adverse effects climate change has on women.

Women are an essential force for climate solutions that work for the entire world population. Businesses can benefit from highlighting the relevance of gender equality to climate outcomes and from amplifying women’s roles as leaders, low-carbon product influencers, and climate-focused investors. Below, we explore the greater role women can play on each of these fronts.

Source: Catalyst, OECD, Credit Suisse, Clim8, Oliver Wyman analysis

There are especially few senior women in the six highest carbon-emitting industries: energy generation, mineral and metal mining, manufacturing, agriculture, transport, and construction. These sectors together account for 80% of the emissions reductions needed by the end of 2030 to prevent global temperatures from rising more than 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre‑industrial levels.

Women are an essential force for climate solutions that work for the entire world population. Businesses can benefit from highlighting the relevance of gender equality to climate outcomes and from amplifying women’s roles as leaders, low-carbon product influencers, and climate-focused investors. The greater role women can play on each of these fronts. Role of women as climate changemakers is crucial. 

To reach net-zero emissions by 2050, all organizations should close the climate action gender gap by recognizing and acting on the roles that women play. Collaborative action is needed in all types of organizations.

75% of women consider the environmental impact of their purchases when they believe that it has a big effect on climate change, compared with 64% of men.

Watch the video: Why Gender Matters for Effective Adaptation to Climate Change

Watch the video: A Message From the Future

Source: OliverWyman Forum, 2021